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20130113
20130113
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and of course their religions were around me and a lot of folk religion, so one can say that this might be seen as the blossoming of the way that i came in to the world. >> what part of china? >> inland, rural, 70 miles from shanghai. >> what time period are we talking about? >> you know, being chinese in my formation, we look on age as honor, so i'm proud to say that i was born 76 years ago i'm 76 years convenientable. >> and who i long did you grow up in china. >> i was 17 when i came to this country. >> so that's formative. let's talk a little bit about the impact of the modern world on the traditional chinese religious systems when you were growing up. did you see the challenges to those religious systems at that time or was it too early? >> no, we were -- well, it was too early but also we were too rural and therefore modern things had made very few in roads. when i came to this country with this traditional background then i slammed in to it and actually slammed into it hard, because my longest teaching appointment was at mit which is almost like the modern and the future in a microcosm.
talk about religion. been division and the religious order discussed at the time of the founding and how is that been according to your account, simplified in use by the right-wing? >> guest: it depends on the u.s.. they were founding fathers who are very religious. there were founders who believed that this was going to be a christian nation and that we needed the inspiration of god in the bible in our politics. i think patrick henry is a good example of a very religious founding father, and that was one of the -- one of the positions of the founding era. there were founding fathers who were not christian. the word deists are unitarians. there were some who were deist or unitarian who believe that religion was sort of a good way to control the masses. they didn't particularly care much for church and they thought it was a nice thing, and they perhaps george washington and john adams fell in to that category. they expressed a lot of religious doubts but did not really try to slow it down in the public sphere. and then there's jefferson and madison, who went through a very lengthy
that government may not substantially burden the free exercise of religion without it extremely wait of public interest. and i defend those ideas. the second prong of my approach is for consistency and a self examination in our approach to the religion of other people. many policies lack the basic virtue to have a coherent and consistent policy across similar cases. many are flawed in a deeper way people act in ways to give there group special privileges. so we will see that but the third prong i argue even with good principles and consisting reasoning we still need something more. active, a curious imagination learned about the lives of others and coming to see how the world looks from other points of view i give works of literature from both adults come to children to promote the a understanding. i use the history of prejudice as a historical case that is good to think about. for the 19th century antisemitism it has the unfortunate features and the obvious wrongness may guide us as we think of issues that are too close to be seen with a clarity deserved. but now with second prong and princip
. it is not the same religion, but we have much in common. >> but others could not accept the idea of muslims praying in a former christian church. >> i think it would be better if they set up a mosque someplace else in town. ifhe christians keep giving ground, we will lose our faith and identity. after all, france is a christian country. >> the sale of the church would not have had a happy ending. for the archdiocese responsible for the church got involved and decided instead to sell the church to a charity. the bishop justified the decision by saying the paris- based charity was nondenominational. this even though it is called the fraternity of st. aloysius and is dedicated to the same st. as the church. they are collecting donations to buy the building. their motto "stop the mosque" makes their position clear. >> we are opposed to converting the church into a mosque. christenings, weddings, and funerals were once held there. now that will all be wiped away. the church will be something else entirely. we have gathered thousands of signatures from all over france and from canada and switzerland. som
to the list, saying that would be direct government funding of religion. >>> at the vatican, in his annual address to the vatican diplomatic corps, pope benedict xvi had strong words on syria and the international economy. the pope called for more humanitarian aid to syria and warned that there will be no winners in the current situation, only "a field of ruins." the pope blamed the worldwide economic crisis on a desire for profit and spoke of the growing divide between the few who grow richer and the many who grow poorer. >>> meanwhile, in syria, the humanitarian situation continues to worsen. the world food program said it is unable to reach one million syrians in need of food. the group said it's had to withdraw its staff from certain cities because of the violence. >>> in los angeles, a judge has ordered the catholic archdiocese to release nearly 30,000 internal documents on the clergy sex abuse crisis, without removing any names. previously, another judge had ruled the archdiocese could redact the names but that decision has now been overturned. the church says it will comply, althoug
of the 20th century. he did not in the end adopt some foreign religion. he adopted his own religion, that of his ancestors. similarly, we don't have to seek to have islamist convert to what is to them a foreign religion, but rather an islam of their own ancestors, one and poisoned by the extremism we associate with wahhabism and al qaeda. the problem for us is that christianity was very much part of western culture and something that we were knowledgeable about and suited to fight over. islam is different. is hard for our government to be effective with the struggle of that religion. i just want to also note by the way ,-com,-com ma because charlie mentioned an awful, the journey. "witness" was one of the greatest autobiographical groups on extremism. perhaps one of the greatest novels about it. and they had great political impacts in part because they were great literary works, works of art. there are some islamic works about breaking with extremism. the islamist by ed hussein, radical i -- but i don't think there are any such works that are great works of art scene from the point
religion you are, what economic class you're in, what your gender is or theoretically, at least, what your sexual orientation is. at least that's the way it's supposed to be. certainly, most libertarians already get that, and i think that why they have a sp
and religion" i just want to say a few words of the subject matter to be discussed today were the of what became a years of endeavor and peter bergen will be your host and moderator today. catherine unfortunately is not here to the -- today but is a:editor about the taliban and its environment southern afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want
was put in there. remember, this is the second amendment, second only after free speech, religion. the founders took this very, very seriously. this is not an amendment to guarantee the right to hunt squirrels. so it's very important that we have an adult conversation, stop ranting and raving over gun violence. of course, we all hate gun violence. but for example, let us ask the question, why have we seen the mass shootings that we have? it is not the law-abiding citizens, using their guns. in fact, there is a very close connection with psychiatric drugs. i have a forbes column i wrote that should be appearing very soon, it draws the connection between the presence of these psychiatric drug, people -- those so-called lone wolf shooters, especially the young people who are on these psychiatric drugs, anti-depressants or in withdrawal from them, why isn't congress holding hearings on this? rather than pulling the nra do into these meetings and brow-beating them over exercising a right that the founders guaranteed, why not invite the pharmaceutical companies into capitol hill and see
john ander nathalie. "u.s. news and world report," religion editor. your book to your credit. >> my first book. >> and still working at "u.s. news & world report." >> i still am. >> if i mention the name funk to you, who is he, robert funk? >> he's a bible scholar, new testament scholar who is founder and leader of a group called jesus seminar. a group of scholars for the last 15 years have been exploring the historical jesus. >> yeah, does he have very much standing in the academic community paula fredriksen interhe represents the school of representation. >> she's also a diplomat. well, funk is saying some pretty vacanting things. and it appears as though he is off the charts, does it not? he's organized a semiannual seminar that you speak of. and his forum debunks the sayis from the cross, the virgin birth, the resurrection, jesus' miracles and he sees jesus as a sort of jewish socrates, almost a lenny bruce character, is that right. >> that's right. >> you find no evidence in any of your scholarship, by the way, that jesus was a revolutionary, correct? interi find counterevidenc
. it is not have to do with any religion. you make a commitment to society. you love and protect each other. two men are to women love each other but they will never make children. reaching o -- or two when in love each other but they will never be able to make children. >> this has brought together conservatives in people from christian, jewish, and muslim communities. this was a carefully managed presentation of mainstream unity. the organizers are trying to make sure only slogans are on display appeared their conscious of accusations of homophobia. they do not want to be portrayed in that way. >> despite them claiming this is a thing of family, the right watch this with dismay. >> i understand that some of them are not. it is very simple. they are on the streets. they are opening up everything. francois hollande has a secure enough parliament majority that the legalization of marriage will probably pass by jean. support is slipping. most french are with him on that. those rallying on saturday insist they will fight all the way. changing the traditional french family means weakening the very f
on the battle over the british flag. and messages from the pulpit regarding guns and religion are united. the deep divide in the wake of the sandy hook shootings. ♪ [ male announcer ] its lightweight construction makes it nimble... ♪ its road gripping performance makes it a cadillac. introducing the all-new cadillac xts. available with advanced all-wheel drive. [ engine revving ] it's bringing the future forward. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto-insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. >>> mortgage rates ticked up this past week.
.s. -- religious freedom. the role of religion and the narratives that the afghan taliban offering the pakistani taliban offer often couched in militant terms, does that play with the populations of taliban -- talibanistan and something that brings something closer to them or is it just political verbiage with a different addressing? >> answers have to be like 30 seconds please. sorry. we have got to wrap it up. >> in the case of police, the reason there was not investment and police in pakistan is because of sheer incompetence. of course that leads to lack of political will. i will also criticize the government as well as the pakistan government. in 2001 to 2008 the u.s. started looking at the police is an important institution. but why from 2001 to 2000 adobe's departments and organizations in the u.s. never talked about counterterrorism as a civil law issue. >> a good point. >> there are elements of the taliban who believe this is the right time to negotiate because they don't think that the '90s taliban will be reconstituted. there are others who disagree with that, but that is essentially w
its own religion and incompatible view of the other will have to put up with one another and find ways to work together. with apple and google, we compete in the mobile world, but we are also search partners. >> there are others who are not members of the gang of four. >> there are many potential candidates. twitter is 1. even netflix, which i mentioned. and of course microsoft is absent in my calculation, although they certainly wish that they were. [laughter] >> we have some very good questions from the floor that relate to some of this. one question is "hall will scrutiny over the use of user data affect business strategies ?" >> what happens with all of these companies that collect a lot of data, each of them has different views -- rules. their behavior will largely be controlled by the european privacy laws. there's something called the european data protectorate, which is all about what you do with this data. and old simile, the street solution is going to say the data is owned by the person, not the company, or at least not to be used without that person's permission. anonymous
by the public religion research institute- conducted before the newtown shooting- found six in ten catholics support stricter gun control laws, compared to about a third of white evangelical protestants and 42 percent of white mainline protestants. >> "it's just not about theology. it's also about culture and geography." >> reporter: the poll also found white evangelicals are the most likely to own guns. many live in southern and rural areas where guns are a way of life. so what does the bible say about weapons? >> "scripture teaches that christians are not to take weapons and avenge other people. however, there is an affirmation that government evil doers." >> reporter: with polls showing increased support for gun laws after newtown, could we see a shift among evangelicals? >> "it may be a tipping point where more folks in those communities realize that there are things we can do as a society to tamp down this kind of mass violence that doesn't require taking away everybody's guns." >> reporter: pastor daniel darling is calling on fellow evangelicals to support limits on high capacity magaz
. there is some economic fate that he basically made up his own religion and wrote this really weird book called something like this secret history of the universe as revealed through a cult science in the troy, michigan, which i almost used for my title. [laughter] so just to tell the story very quickly, he and his entire family were brutally, gruesomely murdered. they were beheaded and his children were killed as well and it was this big sensational story at the time. you can go through the free press archives and plan on this coverage. and it was never solved. at a certain point i realized it was not far from where i was living over in eastern market. so what to check it out for his house was is just a field now. i just kind of filed it away. weirdly enough, probably a year later, there was another murder, almost literally across the street. it was the drug thing and these kids were trying to scare -- two rival drug houses in this zone and these two teenagers were trying to scare off their rivals and so to do this, i ended up killing them horribly dismembering this guy come in the this random
divide on the issue of gun control. >> reporter: a survey by the public religion research institute, conducted before the newtown shooting, found six in ten catholics support stricter gun control laws, compared to about a third of white evangelical protestants and 42% of white mainline protestants. >> not just about threology but culture and geography. >> reporter: poll found white evangelicals were most likely to own guns. many live in southern and rural areas where guns are a way of life. so, what does the bible say about weapons? >> scripture teaches that christians are not to take weapons and avenge other people however there is an affirmation that government has a divine role to punish evil ers do and so there's ten eggs. >> reporter: with polls showing increased support for gun laws after newtown, could we see a shift among evangelicals? >> may be a tipping point where more folks in those communities realize there are things we can do as a society to tamp down this kind of mass violence that doesn't remember taking away everybody's guns. >> reporter: pastor daniel darling is c
in a democracy and say, now we will fix the problems. it does not happen that way. culture, tradition, religion, ethnic clans are all part of that. you work with the system. i talked about alliances. that is what alliances are important. you work with in those systems. to influence change, affect change. there's so many things going on in the world today that are disgusting, despicable, that we hate. sudan is a good example. we have limitations as to what we can do to change that. we should always be about helping change that, people who want to change it. we have limitations. all powers, all individuals have limitations. nations must be wise enough to understand ho. host: chuck hagel. then-senator barack obama and chuck hagel traveling to the middle east. hagel co talks about the limits of power. guest: one of the conditions that president obama and his team said, a lot of demands and expectations around the world. a lot of challenges. america's role is to not challenge the foes, but to be dependable for the allies. i think one of the real challenges is when you think strategically. when you h
your language and your religion, we will do it. but at the same time we're going to insist on our own identity as a mandate people. so you could say that there after the identity grew as a counterpoint to this idea that they should be, civilized highest christians. now, all of these tensions were on display because once the supreme court ruled in their favor, and said they could go home, well, the supreme court also ruled the united states government had no responsibility to pay for their going home so how were they going to get home? well, ma for the longest time people believed that some wealthy abolitionists would pay for this, but, in fact, what happened was the abolitionists with the cooperation of the amistad africans organize a big tour up and down the eastern seaboard in which the amistad africans would go and speak and perform, perform their knowledge of christianity, performed their knowledge of english, performed their civilization. and at the same time, they would insist on singing their native african songs. the african side was always there. and here's the wildest part o
's a wave of intolerance sweeping this country. intolerance of any public expression of god or religion, it's a wave and sweeping this country. >> tucker: where is it coming from? >> certainly interest spokes people, activists who would like to wipe the face of god not only of public conscious. >> alisyn: what he's saying, he doesn't believe that president obama believes every word of the bible. if you don't believe every word and many americans don't. >> because we don't practice all ten commandments take them down from the courtroom. right now it totally makes sense to do what he is suggesting, get rid of the bible, get rid of any prayer in the inauguration, right? we should get, totally take "in god we trust" off the dollar bill. we should absolutely get rid of any expression whatsoever of religion, if we believe, if we believe that true meaning of separation of church and state means that god stays within the walls of a church. and that's what these activists are doing. we should also take the mention of god out of our constitution, in god we trust, really? >> well, this guy is not goin
governments. it does not happen that way. culture, tradition, religion, ethnic, are all part of that. i talked about alliances. that is why alliances are important. you work within those systems. to effect change and influence change. there are some things going on in the world today that are disgusting, that are despicable, that we hate. but we have limitations as to what we can do to change that. we should always be about helping the people who want to change it. we have limitations. and great powers run into very difficult times when they do not recognize that they too have limitations to their power. all individuals have limitations. nations must be wise enough to understand this. host: as senator chuck hagel, in his speech, and two years ago -- as you hear the words he talks about the limits of power. that echoed what the president said that in 2008 when he was running for the white house. guest: i think that is right. i think one of the conditions that president obama and his team -- a lot of demands and expectations of rumba world and a lot of challenges. america's role is not just to k
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21